Tag Archives: Perimeter security

Some thoughts on “Identity is the new perimeter”

28 January 2018

With the increasing adoption of cloud services, the traditional perimeter security approach becomes less and less effective. The on-premise security layer, which protects users against cyber-attacks, is just no longer existent if users have direct access to a company’s cloud services from any location, at any time and, in the best case, from any device.

The four “A”s, Authentication, Authorization, Administration and Audit, become more and more important in a [hybrid] cloud based working environment.

“When identity and access management (IAM) works well, it means the right people have the right access to the right resources when they need them with appropriate governance in place from wherever the data or application is needed.” [1]

The magic word is “right”: With IAM we control the access of well-known groups of people to well-known resources. Unfortunately, cyber attackers do often not belong to these groups.

NIST NVD Statistics: Privileges Required

From the NIST NVD we learn, that 67% of the vulnerabilities published in 2017 need no privileges for exploitation.

Privileges None means: “The attacker is unauthorized prior to attack, and therefore does not require any access to settings or files to carry out an attack.” [2]

This holds e.g. for remote code execution (RCE) vulnerabilities. An RCE allows an attacker to get full control of the victim’s computer or service, in the worst case with administrative privileges. With this, the entire new perimeter is bypassed. For an RCE example see CVE-2017-11459. [3]

Identity becomes an important part of a new perimeter but can never replace the perimeter.

NIST NVD 2017 Statistics: User Interaction Required

The NIST NVD data give another important insight for shaping a company’s security strategy: In 41% (5958) of 14647 vulnerabilities the user must interact with the attacker for their exploitation.

This means that well-made user awareness training can prevent lots of cyber-attacks.

Have a great week.


[1] AusCERT 2017 – Identity is the new perimeter
Anthony Caruana, 05/30/2017, CSO Online
https://www.cso.com.au/article/619970/auscert-2017-identity-new-perimeter/
Last seen: 01/28/2018

[2] Common Vulnerability Scoring System v3.0: Specification Document
https://www.first.org/cvss/specification-document
Last seen: 01/28/2018

[3] CVE-2017-11459
https://nvd.nist.gov/vuln/detail/CVE-2017-11459
Last seen: 01/28/2018

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Some thoughts on „A Cyberattack on the U.S. Power Grid“ by Robert K. Knake

15 April 2017

The Contingency Planning Memorandum No. 31 „A Cyberattack on the U.S. Power Grid“, published by Robert K. Knake at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) in April 2017, illustrates very clearly how vulnerable critical infrastructures like the U.S. power grid are. This memorandum is really worth reading.

Ultimately, for effective protection of the society in the case of a breakdown of the power grid we need something like a nation wide operated ISMS, with hundreds of stakeholders from the private and public sector. This is a Herculean task in the U.S., and needs a miracle in Europe.

But the discussion of attack vectors is characterized by the traditional ISA 95 paradigm:

Regardless of which part of the power grid is targeted, attackers would need to conduct extensive research, gain initial access to utility business networks (likely through spearphishing), work to move through the business networks to gain access to control systems, and then identify targeted systems and develop the capability to disable them.

In the era of the IIoT, the network perimeter with all its high sophisticated security controls is no longer existent. For example, a lot of Industrial Control Systems are already connected directly to the internet today. With this, the effort for attacking critical infrastructures is decreasing, as well as the likelihood of detection.

From my point of view, it is of crucial need to take this paradigm change into account in risk management.

Happy Easter!