Tag Archives: Full Disk Encrpytion

Vulnerabilities in self-encrypting SSDs let cyber criminals bypass BitLocker Full Disk Encryption. Don’t Panic!

25 November 2018

Full disk encryption (FDE) applications like BitLocker represent the final bastion in protection against theft and loss of laptops.

No wonder that post “Flaws in Popular SSD Drives Bypass Hardware Disk Encryption”[1], published by Lawrence Abrams on 11/5/2018 at Bleeping Computer, irritated the security community largely.

I scanned the announcement from Radboud University[2] and the preliminary version of the research paper and found no need to enter panic mode.

Hard Drive Lock by Hello Many from the Noun Project

Hard Drive Lock by Hello Many from the Noun Project

What happened. Researchers from Radboud University in The Netherlands found two critical security weaknesses, CVE-2018-12037 and CVE-2018-12038, in the encryption of some SSDs allowing access to the data without knowledge of any secret. Windows 8/10 BitLocker is able to make use of the hardware encryption capabilities to speed up the encryption process. Thus, BitLocker is compromised.

During normal operating conditions it is hardly possible to exploit these vulnerabilities because a cyber criminal must remove the SSD from the computer and connect a hardware debugger to reach the secrets.

Thus we face an increased risk if the device is left unattended, e.g. evil maid attack[3], lost or stolen. Or, if the device was lost some time ago and kept unchanged for whatever reasons.

Actually, you should have procedures in place to deal with stolen or lost devices. These must be updated now:

  • Users must change their passwords directly after the loss of a device is reported.
  • All certificates, soft and hard tokens used for securing remote access or access to sensitive data and services must be invalidated directly after a loss is reported.
  • The help desk must be notified of the loss and advised to report a security incident in the case of requests regarding the stolen device or the affected user accounts.

In any case, to keep the impact of a loss small the best advice for users is to store as little as possible sensitive data on portable devices.

For details on how to handle this issue please refer to the Microsoft security advisory ADV180028[4], published on 11/6/2018.

The big question is: Who takes care of the self encrypting external usb disks with keypad based on the buggy SSDs?

Have a great week.


  1. Abrams L. Flaws in Popular SSD Drives Bypass Hardware Disk Encryption [Internet]. BleepingComputer. 2018 [cited 2018 Nov 17]. Available from: https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/flaws-in-popular-ssd-drives-bypass-hardware-disk-encryption/
  2. Radboud University. Radboud University researchers discover security flaws in widely used data storage devices [Internet]. Radboud University. 2018 [cited 2018 Nov 17]. Available from: https://www.ru.nl/english/news-agenda/news/vm/icis/cyber-security/2018/radboud-university-researchers-discover-security/
  3. Rouse M. What is evil maid attack? – Definition from WhatIs.com [Internet]. SearchSecurity. 2018 [cited 2018 Nov 25]. Available from: https://searchsecurity.techtarget.com/definition/evil-maid-attack
  4. MSRC M. ADV180028 | Guidance for configuring BitLocker to enforce software encryption [Internet]. Security TechCenter. 2018 [cited 2018 Nov 17]. Available from: https://portal.msrc.microsoft.com/en-US/security-guidance/advisory/ADV180028
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