Tag Archives: Cyber Security Stratgey

Top secret information about Australia’s military hacked – SME’s overstretched with Cyber Security Frameworks

15 October 2017

Lisa Martins report Top secret information about Australias military hacked, published on October 12th, 2017 at news.com.au, about a one year old attack on an Australian defense contractor is another example that small businesses are technically and organizationally overstretched with the challenges of cyber security.

The best approach for SMEs would be to set up a cyber security framework like the NIST Cyber Security Framework or an ISO 27001 based framework. But the effort to do this is for small businesses just too high.

For SMEs to stay ahead of the cyber security curve a light version of such frameworks is required, with focus put on actively managing the risk.

The Strategies to Mitigate Cyber Security Incidents of the Australian Signals Directorate (ASD) puts focus on the basics. If carefully implemented and regularly assessed, the security level goes up and this kind of attacks are no longer possible. Even large businesses can raise their security level when implementing the ASDs recommendations.

But when it comes to critical infrastructures a full implementation of a cyber security frameworks is the only way to survive in the long-term. By the way, the first task in the NIST CSF core is asset management…

Have a great week.

Advertisements

The IoT brings down the Internet

29 October 2016

Last Friday, a large botnet, which was powered by the Mirai malware, caused a significant outage of Internet in the United States. This headline in MOTHERBOARD sums it up: ‘Blame the Internet of Things for Destroying the Internet Today’.

IoT devices are inherently insecure.

  • IoT devices are, for instance, very often secured by default passwords, which need not be necessarily changed during startup. And for ease of startup WLAN is powered on by default.
  • A software life-cycle concept, e.g. patching of critical vulnerabilities, is in general not provided. With this, the devices become vulnerable to the exploitation of new critical software bugs during operating time.

A single compromised IoT device creates no significant impact on the internet. But if attackers exploit the vulnerabilities of millions of devices and join them to a botnet, it is very likely that this will have a major impact even on well secured critical infrastructures.

We need to save the Internet from the IoT. Strict statutory guidelines are required to prevent the collapse of critical infrastructures. Some easy to implement technical rules are for example:

  • WLAN is by default off.
  • WLAN can only be activated through an out-of-bound connection.
  • WLAN is activated only after the default password has been changed.

A security label for IoT devices is required to support consumers. The European Commission already established the basis for a security label in the ‘Cybersecurity Strategy of the European Union’, published February 6, 2013:

‘Develop industry-led standards for companies’ performance on cybersecurity and improve the information available to the public by developing security labels or kite marks helping the consumer navigate the market.’

Devices which do not comply with the basic requirements should be labeled accordingly. In addition, the vendors of such devices are obliged to take out a cyber insurance to mitigate the impact posed by insecure devices.

In ‘We Need to Save the Internet from the Internet of Things’ published on October 6, 2016 in MOTHERBOARD, Bruce Schneier states:

The IoT will remain insecure unless government steps in and fixes the problem.

Let’s start!

Have a good weekend.