Tag Archives: Chrome

What is the Most Secure Web Browser?

23 September 2018

For some weeks now I am busy with patch strategy and vulnerability management. When new critical vulnerabilities shows up two questions must be addressed:

  1. How fast must we patch the vulnerable systems?
  2. What vulnerabilities must be patched with highest priority? Or mitigated, if a patch is not available in due time.

Speed is the key in cyber security. The faster we find and patch vulnerable systems the greater is the chance that cyber criminals cannot exploit the vulnerabilities.

The exploit is the weapon in cyber warfare. A vulnerability as such increases the potential risk only. Once an exploit is published that can leverage the vulnerability, the vulnerability becomes a real risk. And if the exploit is “in the wild”, i.e. if the exploit is actively used by cyber criminals for attacks, the IT organization is on red alert.

Unfortunately, no one knows when an exploit spreads in the wild. Therefore, the cautious answer to the above questions is:

“The moment an exploit for a critical vulnerability is published it must be patched directly, at least on critical systems. If a patch is not available proper protective measures must be applied to mitigate the risk effectively.”

Browsers are the most critical systems because they are used in a hostile environment. Browsers are very complex applications, thus prone of errors.  Between 2013 and 2017 about 11% of 40671 vulnerabilities in total were found in the 4 major browsers Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer and Edge.

Market Share Browsers 2013 - 2017

Market Share Browsers 2013 – 2017. Data source: StatCounter

Browser Vulnerabilities 2013 - 2017

Browser Vulnerabilities 2013 – 2017

It remarkable to see that 67% of all browser vulnerabilities are related to IE, Edge and Firefox although they have only a small market share (11% in 2017).

Exploit publication date relative to CVE publication date

Exploit publication date relative to CVE publication date 2013 – 2017

The graphic above shows the number of exploits that are published within one month before the CVE is published compared to the number of exploits published within one month after the CVE is published.

Except for Chrome and Firefox the majority of exploits is published after the vulnerability is published. Nevertheless, we have to patch immediately on publication of a CVE.

How many exploits spread in the wild? This question is hard to answer. The Symantec attack signatures give a useful indication. “An attack signature is a unique arrangement of information that can be used to identify an attacker’s attempt to exploit a known operating system or application vulnerability.” 

Exploits in the Wild 2013 - 2017

Exploits in the Wild 2013 – 2017

This is an amazing result, isn’t it.

Have a great week!


Data sources

  1. NIST. NVD Database. https://nvd.nist.gov/
  2. Offensive Security. Exploit Database. https://www.exploit-db.com
  3. Andrea Fioraldi. CVE Searchsploit.
    https://github.com/andreafioraldi/cve_searchsploit/tree/master/cve_searchsploit
  4. NIST. EXPLOIT-DB Reference Map. http://cve.mitre.org/data/refs/refmap/source-EXPLOIT-DB.html
  5. Symantec.com. Attack Signatures.  https://www.symantec.com/security_response/attacksignatures/
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Chrome’s new Site Isolation feature protects users from the Spectre vulnerability

14 July 2018

Spectre

Spectre

A new variant Spectre V1.1 (1) was published on July, 10 2018 by Vladimir Kiriansky and Carl Waldspurger. The vulnerability is tracked in CVE-2018-3693 (2). The good news is that the CVSS V3 score is 5.6 (Medium) with attack vector Local.

As with the original Spectre vulnerability CVE-2017-5753 (3) published in January 2018 the greatest risk for business users and consumers bears in malicious websites weaponized with drive-by downloads or viruses (4) using the Spectre POC code.

The virus issue is easy to mitigate. The inbuilt auto-update feature of anti-malware solutions ensures that the latest pattern updates are available within few hours after a virus shows up in the wild.

But the internet issue is much harder to solve, in particular for consumers and SME. Fortunately, Goggle announced on July 11, 2018 a new feature Site Isolation for the Chrome browser that mitigates the risk borne from the Spectre vulnerability.

Chrome is based on a multi-process architecture. Different tabs are rendered by different renderer processes. With site isolation enabled, cross-site iframes are rendered in different processes than the parent frame and data exchange between the parent and the iframe processes is blocked. For a technical overview see Charlie Reis’s post ‘Mitigating Spectre with Site Isolation in Chrome’ (5). Further details are available from the Chromium Projects (6).

Site Isolation is available since Chrome 67. Input chrome://flags/#enable-site-per-process to check if the feature is enabled:

Chromium Strict Site Isolation Feature

Chromium Strict Site Isolation Feature

If you use an older version of Chrome Site Isolation is the best opportunity to update to the latest version.

Have a great weekend.


  1. Beltov M. CVE-2018-3693: New Spectre 1.1 Vulnerability Emerges [Internet]. SensorsTechForum. 2018 [cited 2018 Jul 14]. Available from: https://sensorstechforum.com/cve-2018-3693-new-spectre-1-1-vulnerability-emerges/
  2. CVE-2018-3693 Detail [Internet]. NIST NVD. 2018 [cited 2018 Jul 14]. Available from: https://nvd.nist.gov/vuln/detail/CVE-2018-3693
  3. CVE-2017-5753 Detail [Internet]. NIST NVD. 2018 [cited 2018 Jul 14]. Available from: https://nvd.nist.gov/vuln/detail/CVE-2017-5753
  4. FortiGuard SE Team. Meltdown/Spectre Update [Internet]. Fortinet Blog. 2018 [cited 2018 Jul 14]. Available from: https://www.fortinet.com/blog/threat-research/the-exponential-growth-of-detected-malware-targeted-at-meltdown-and-spectre.html
  5. Reis C. Mitigating Spectre with Site Isolation in Chrome [Internet]. Google Online Security Blog. 2018 [cited 2018 Jul 14]. Available from: https://security.googleblog.com/2018/07/mitigating-spectre-with-site-isolation.html
  6. The Chromium Projects. Site Isolation – The Chromium Projects [Internet]. [cited 2018 Jul 14]. Available from: https://www.chromium.org/Home/chromium-security/site-isolation

NSS Labs Tests Leading Web Browsers for Secure End User Experience

6 November 2016

On November 1, 2016 NSS Labs published the 2016 Web Browser Security Comparative Test Report.  Two tests with the most popular browsers (Google Chrome Version 53.0.2785, Microsoft Edge Version 38.14393.0.0 and Mozilla Firefox Version 48.0.2) had been run to check how effective they deal with socially engineered malware (SEM) and phishing attacks. The results are of interest for end-users because the inbuilt browser features were evaluated in the test.

When it comes to protection against phishing attacks the time needed until a URL is blocked is important. Microsoft Edge is the browser of choice, followed by Firefox and Chrome.

In the second test the protection against Socially Engineered Malware was evaluated. Again, the average time to block the malware is of great importance, and again, Microsoft Edge is the browser of choice, followed by Chrome and Firefox. The average time to block is 0.16 hours for Microsoft Edge, 2.66 hours for Chrome and 3.76 hours for Firefox.

Happy reading, and have a good weekend.