Monthly Archives: April 2018

US Gas Pipelines Hit by Cyber-Attack

15 April 2018

The report “US Gas Pipelines Hit by Cyber-Attack” (1), published on April 13, 2018 in Infosecurity Magazine, sounds more dramatic than it actually is. The attackers compromised a system for “electronic data interchange” (EDI) to some of the largest US energy providers. No impact on critical infrastructures, at least until now.

Bloomberg Technology (2) reports that at least four US pipeline companies were affected by the attack.

What surprised me was that Jim Guinn, managing director and global cyber security leader for energy, utilities, chemicals and mining at Accenture Plc, said (2):

 

“There is absolutely nothing of intrinsic value for someone to infiltrate the EDI other than to navigate a network to do something more malicious. All bad actors are looking for a way to get into the museum to go steal the Van Gogh painting.”

I cannot support this. The EDI system contains the access details to the systems used in the customer networks for data exchange. These details are the free admission ticket to the customer networks for the cyber-criminals.

Thus, it is very important that at least the access data to customer systems are changed directly after an attack is detected. In addition, the customers should check their networks for suspicious data transfers and indicators for lateral movement.

Have a good weekend.


1. Muncaster P. US Gas Pipelines Targeted in Cyber-Attack [Internet]. Infosecurity Magazine. 2018 [cited 2018 Apr 13]. Available from: https://www.infosecurity-magazine.com:443/news/us-gas-pipelines-hit-by-cyberattack/

2. Malik NS, Collins R, Vamburkar M. Cyberattack Pings Data Systems of At Least Four Gas Networks. Bloomberg.com [Internet]. 2018 Apr 3 [cited 2018 Apr 15]; Available from: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-04-03/day-after-cyber-attack-a-third-gas-pipeline-data-system-shuts

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RYZENFALL, MASTERKEY, FALLOUT, CHIMERA – Don’t Panic!

3 April 2018

CTS-Labs publication (1) of new branded security flaws in AMD’s latest Ryzen and EPYC processors attracted much media attention.

Much Ado About Nothing

Much Ado About Nothing. Made with WortArt.com.

Two facts on RYZENFALL, MASTERKEY, FALLOUT and CHIMERA:

  • In all cases the attacker requires administrative access to exploit the processor flaws.
  • For exploitation of MASTERKEY the attacker needs to re-flash the bios.

For a good overview see post ‘AMD Flaws’ (2) in the Trail of Bits blog.

To put it succinctly:: An attacker managed to fully compromise a system based on an AMD Ryzen or EPYC processor and to stay undetected. Then he starts exploiting Masterkey, flashes the BIOS and reboots the system. As a result he gets directly detected.

That makes no sense. Once I fully compromised a system I have plenty opportunities to run a deep dive into the victim’s network and, to stay undetected. The risk of getting detected when exploiting e.g. MASTERKEY is just too high.

The world of threat actors can be divided in two classes: Non-Nation State Actors and Nation State Actors. In particular MASTERKEY fits perfectly in the cyber weapon arsenal of the latter because only they have the resources to compromise the processors where it is most convenient, in the supply chain.

I don’t like branded vulnerabilities because they keep us from dealing with really important security issues.

Have a great week!


  1. CTS-Labs. Severe Security Advisory on AMD Processors [Internet]. AMDFLAWS. 2018 [cited 2018 Apr 3]. Available from: https://safefirmware.com/amdflaws_whitepaper.pdf

  2. Guido D. “AMD Flaws” Technical Summary [Internet]. Trail of Bits Blog. 2018 [cited 2018 Apr 3]. Available from: https://blog.trailofbits.com/2018/03/15/amd-flaws-technical-summary/