IBM Webinar: Force the Bad Guys to Use Zero Day Exploits with Continuous Endpoint Enforcement and Patching

22 October 2016

On Tuesday, I watched the IBM webinar ‘Force the Bad Guys to Use Zero Day Exploits with Continuous Endpoint Enforcement and Patching’.

On slide 3 one could read the really interesting statement ‘NSA: no zero days were used in any high profile breaches over last 24 months’.

Slide 3 - Force the Bad Guys to Use Zero Day Exploits — and Why That’s a Good Thing

Slide 3 – Force the Bad Guys to Use Zero Day Exploits — and Why That’s a Good Thing

Curtis Dukes, deputy national manager of security systems within the NSA, said that NSA has been involved in incident response or mitigation efforts for all ‘high profile incidents’ one has read about in the Washington Post or the New York times.

In all this incidents hacker used somewhat simple technology like spear phishing, water holing and USB-drive delivery to get onto the victim’s networks.

In the last 24 months, not one zero day has been used in these high profile intrusions.

That is a very interesting insight. Moreover, Curtis Dukes said that

The fundamental problem we faced in every one of those incidents was poor cyber hygiene.

The central idea of the webinar is to harden all systems by applying at least all existing patches to the known vulnerabilities, and in a timely manner. For most of the organizations this is a great challenge: Applying an endless stream of operating system and application patches to thousands of servers and endpoints is a never-ending nightmare. But essential to hinder an attacker, who managed to get on the network, in his lateral movement across the network.

If an attacker cannot exploit existing vulnerabilities, he is forced to install hacking tools from his C&C server. But this will increase the likelihood of detection because the attacker creates anomalies which can be detected e.g. by a current anti-malware solution or a well-tuned SIEM system.

It is important to recognize that cyber hygiene shall not be restricted to patching and password rules. Operating systems offer lots of powerful inbuilt tools, e.g. PowerShell, which can be used by an attacker to move laterally across the network. Such movements a much harder to detect, because they are very similar to standard user behavior. Pass-the-hash attacks are another example where patching is of limited value only.

It is very important to understand what threats a security solution mitigates. But it is of crucial importance to know the gaps and to have some ideas on how to deal with them effectively.

Have a good weekend.

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